To make sure 2016 was sent out just the way it should be-- like a pile of heaping trash, Mariah Carey closed out the year with the worst performance of her career on "Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve with Ryan Seacrest."

And since the almost 6 minutes of basically dead air was on TV sets across the globe, Carey has spoken out a number of times-- first with, "shit happens," then suggesting she was sabotaged and more.



First, let's remind ourselves of this: Carey is one of the best-selling music artists of all-time. She is the reason the word "diva" exists as it does today. She's an icon, a legend and up until a few days ago, she was a professional.

Carey and her team are claiming her in-ears were not working properly from the get-go, telling Yahoo! "We walked to the holding tent about 11:20. We told both stage managers — remember this is not our production team, we're out-sourcing our team which we never do — we told them the mic pack is not working. She can't hear it, it's faint. They brought her a new one, and that one didn't work either, the mic pack was dead. They changed the battery pack. She said she still couldn't hear."

According to the article, Carey could hear by the third song, but it was so bad she yelled the now famous line, ""F— it, I've had enough."

Mostly, it seems like it all went wrong because Carey couldn't lip-sync to her tracks, but again, her team is claiming that's not true, "It's not lip-syncing. Lip-syncing is when people don't sing at all. This is what people should understand. Every artist sings to a track, especially in circumstances like that when it's really loud and impossible to have a great musical performance."

Re-watching the performance over and over again and realizing there are very few vocals on the tracks, Carey's team seems to be telling the truth on that one-- it's hard to lip-sync without vocal tracks.

As for their role in the fiasco Dick Clark Productions has called any claims of sabotage on their part absurd, "To suggest that [Dick Clark Productions], as producer of music shows including the American Music Awards, Billboard Music Awards, New Year's Rockin' Eve and Academy of Country Music Awards, would ever intentionally compromise the success of any artist is defamatory, outrageous and frankly absurd. In very rare instances there are of course technical errors that can occur with live television, however, an initial investigation has indicated that [Dick Clark Productions] had no involvement in the challenges associated with Ms. Carey's New Year's Eve performance. We want to be clear that we have the utmost respect for Ms. Carey as an artist and acknowledge her tremendous accomplishments in the industry."

No matter what-- we were able to step into the new year with this wonderful piece of terrible.