Sam Hunt Releases Intimate and Insightful New Song, “Sinning With You”

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Sam Hunt new single Sinning with You
Photo by Tammie Arroyo/AFF-USA.com

It’s a new year and that means new music from many country artists. Sam Hunt has stepped up to throw his hat into the ring with the sexy new song, “Sinning With You,” a song that may reveal a little more about who Sam Hunt is and where he is headed on his musical journey.

[RELATED: Sam Hunt Returns With New Song, “Kinfolks,” Reflecting His Rural Roots [Listen]]

Sam doesn’t deviate very far from what has worked in the past, utilizing drum loops to maintain that urban feel in this slow-rolling groove, however, where Sam has earned a reputation for his songs that lean more heavily on the spoken word, “Sinning With You,” features the award- winning songwriter singing all but a very brief spoken line.

Co-written by Sam, Paul DiGiovanni, Josh Osborne and Emily Weisband, the lyrics seem to tackle the weighty subject of the push-pull of a pure and honest love accompanied by unapologetic passion, and the question of redemption and forgiveness. In the chorus, Sam sings:

“I never felt like I was sinning with you / Always felt like I could talk to God in the morning / I knew that I would end up with you / Always felt like I could talk to God in the morning.”

Whether the tune is a homage to Sam’s beautiful, benevolent and very private wife, Hannah, is not yet known, but it certainly feels as if it comes from his perspective, especially since the singer has often praised his bride — a nurse and the daughter of a pastor.

My past was checkered, your spotless record / Was probably in jeopardy / Your place or my place, His Grace and your grace / Felt like the same thing to me.

[RELATED: Sam Hunt Arrested for DUI in Nashville]

It’s too soon to tell if the much-maligned artist will get the same kind of redemption from fans after he was arrested for drunk-driving in late 2019 or when it will come, but the small town country boy who grew up in church probably realizes that the forgiveness that really matters comes from a higher power.