4 Lessons I Learned in My Family's Truck

4 Lessons I Learned in My Family’s Truck

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Growing up, I spent a lot of time in my family’s truck. My childhood probably wasn’t that different from a lot of kids who grew up in a not-so-small Southern town. My family’s truck was a tool for transportation, but it was also a way of life. Our truck was something to be proud of. In it, and around it, I learned a lot of life lessons that I still hold on to today.

4 Lessons I Learned in My Family’s Truck:

1. Compromise

The truck my family had the longest made my dad look like a movie star instead of an electrical engineer. It was really cool looking, but not comfortable for a family of four. My brother and I spent a lot of time arguing over the front seat of that truck and because of those fights I learned to compromise. Compromise meant thinking of someone else (my brother’s much longer legs) and waiting on your turn (I’d end up in the front on a longer trip, not just into town). If I hadn’t learned to compromise in that truck there’s no telling where I’d be today.

2. Patience

Just about every trying experience of my childhood was spent in my family’s truck– the time my mother stalled out during rush hour traffic smack-dab in the middle of our town’s busiest intersection, the one and only time my dad called me a bad word when I was 14, and the time the fast-food place put mustard on my hamburger. Through these terrible experiences with manual transmissions, teenage girl outbursts and angry fathers (and others), I learned to stop and think about what others were going through and how my untimely reactions usually made their situation much worse. I learned to be patient with my mother while she was learning. I learned to pray through my quick tongue and I learned to never yell at my dad for wanting to turn left when I wanted to turn right. I learned that being patient with others and thinking of them first was much more important than my wants. Though, I still don’t want mustard on my hamburgers.

3. Hard Work

I feel safe in saying that if you grew up in a family of only two-door coupes, you probably didn’t learn about hard work the same way I did. I hauled all kinds of things in my family’s truck for my parents, grandparents and even friends. I picked things up and put them in the truck. I took things out of the truck. Driving around in the truck with my family usually meant one thing– it was time to work. (The same is true now, if you’re out of college and own a truck, you’ve been asked to help move something at least 400 times, right?)

4. Family is Important

My dad took my brother and me on a lot of road trips in his truck. Usually, these trips ended in my grandparents’ driveway, and the hours on the road were always full of stories about my grandfather’s World War II days, my grandmother’s days as a champion high school basketball coach and the time my uncle kicked a game-winning field goal on a football field with no lights on it. The many trips to my dad’s childhood home showed me just how devoted he was to his family and me. It was all of those trips to and from visiting family that I learned just how important my family is to me.

On top of all of that, I learned that “R” stands for “reverse,” not “radio” and even if the truck is parked and turned off, if you throw it into “R,” the truck will roll backwards down a hill.

I learned that lesson twice.

What did you learn riding around in trucks with your family? Ram Trucks wants to know what life lessons you learned that you want to pass along to the next generation. You can share your story and possibly be featured in the #RamTravellerStories video series. We proudly present this post, sponsored by our friends at Ram Trucks. 

Image Source: Ram Trucks

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