10 Loudest Stadiums in College Football

10 Loudest Stadiums in College Football

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Being loud at a college football game is part of the experience and pageantry. While there is no official ranking of stadium noise levels, a handful of colleges have attempted to record it. So cover your ears (literally) and see who made the list of loudest college stadiums in recorded decibels.

10 Loudest Stadiums in College Football:

10. Michigan Stadium (Michigan Wolverines)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 110

“The Big House,” appropriately named because of its 109,901 seating capacity, is the largest college football stadium in America (and second largest stadium in the world). Unfortunately, due to its bowl design, it’s unable to adequately ‘hold in sound’ because it has nothing to bounce off and the sound dissipates into the air above. Nevertheless, almost 110,000 people screaming at the same time is sure to be loud.

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9. Neyland Stadium (Tennessee Volunteers)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 114

With a crowd of 102,455 screaming Volunteer fans, you can be sure of two things: (1) the color orange will be permanently burned into your retinas and (2) you will never get “Rocky Top” out of your head.


8. Ben Hill Griffin Stadium (Florida Gators)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 115

When you step into “The Swamp” you can see why it is on the list. With a seating capacity of about 88,548 spectators, along with its intimidating stadium design, it can hold some very loud fans holding true to their Gator fan spirit.


7. Kyle Field (Texas A&M Aggies)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 117

Kyle Field is currently the largest stadium in the SEC with a seating capacity of 102,733. And, thanks to their 12th man student section, it is also one of the most intimidating places to play in college football.

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6. Razorback Stadium (Arkansas Razorbacks)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 117

Do you want to know what it’s like standing 30 feet from a jet engine? Just ask any of the 73,786 Arkansas fans that watched their Razorbacks during the final moments of the 34-30 win against Ole Miss on October 15, 2016.

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5. Beaver Stadium (Penn State Nittany Lions)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 122

Known for its “White Out” themed games, the Penn State Zombie Nation wear white clothes to make it look like a blizzard is about to blow over. It has a capacity of 107,282 and is the second largest stadium in the country.


4. Autzen Stadium (Oregon Ducks)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 127

Autzen Stadium only holds 54,000 people, yet it is one of the loudest stadiums in college football. Its size clearly doesn’t stop the Duck faithful from making life miserable for opposing teams. Year-in and year-out, students flock to the arena in their green and yellow with the reverberating sounds of “Quack, quack, quack”.


3. Tiger Stadium (LSU Tigers)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 130

With 102,321 seats, Tiger Stadium is the fifth biggest football stadium in college football. Legendary Alabama coach Paul “Bear” Bryant described it best, “Baton Rouge happens to be the worst place in the world for a visiting team. It’s like being inside a drum.”


2. Memorial Stadium (Clemson Tigers)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 132

During a 2007 game against Boston College, Clemson fans at Memorial Stadium, another place commonly referred to as “Death Valley,” were measured raising their combined voices to a level of 132.8 dB. That’s loud.

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1. Husky Stadium (Washington Huskies)
Highest Recorded Decibel Level: 133

In 1992 the sound levels in Husky stadium reached 133.6 dB during a game against Nebraska (Washington was ranked No. 1 at the time). Long recognized as one of the loudest stadiums in the nation due to the stadium’s design; almost 70 percent of the seats are located between the end zones, covered by cantilevered metal roofs that trap the sound.

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