Lori Loughlin and Husband Mossimo Giannulli Plead Guilty To College Admission Scandal Charges

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Full House actress Lori Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli have changed their plea. The couple are now pleading guilty to charges stemming from the college admissions scandal.

According to NBC News, Lori and Mossimo will be spending some time in jail for their part in the scandal.

[RELATED: Lori Loughlin Wants Her Charges to Be Dropped in College Admissions Scandal]

Loughlin and her husband will both plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud, and Giannulli will also plead guilty to the charge of honest services wire and mail fraud.

For those pleas, Loughlin will be sentenced to 2 months in prison with a $150,000 fine. She will also be put under two years supervised release and get 100 hours of community service. Giannulli will be sentenced to five months in prison with a $250,000 fine. He will then undergo two years of supervised release and 250 hours of community service.

“Under the plea agreements filed today, these defendants will serve prison terms reflecting their respective roles in a conspiracy to corrupt the college admissions process and which are consistent with prior sentences in this case,” U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling said in a statement. “We will continue to pursue accountability for undermining the integrity of college admissions.”

[RELATED: Lori Loughlin and Husband Mossimo Giannulli Plead Not Guilty in College Bribery Scandal]

The trouble began for Loughlin when she and her husband Mossimo Giannulli were accused of paying $500,000 to get their daughters into University of Southern California. Last year, the couple pleaded not guilty to a number of assertions, including conspiracy to commit fraud, conspiracy to commit money laundering and bribery.

Fellow actress Felicity Huffman had plead guilty early on in the process and has already served her time. Huffman received a sentence of 14 days in prison.

A new court date has not been set.