Michael Ian Black Gets Slammed on Twitter For Defending Comedian Louis CK; Apologizes

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Michael Ian Black
Photo courtesy of Michael Ian Black Instagram

After disappearing for a few months following allegations of sexual assault, comedian Louis CK resurfaced Sunday night at the Comedy Cellar in New York City, to perform a set.

The news of his appearance sparked outrage on Twitter with many people skewering the comedian. But one actor/comedian, Michael Ian Black, came to Louis C.K.’s defense and ended up taking a beating on the social media outlet.

“Will take heat for this, but people have to be allowed to serve their time and move on with their lives. I don’t know if it’s been long enough, or his career will recover, or if people will have him back, but I’m happy to see him try,” Michael posted regarding Louis’ return.

The flood gates were opened.

“Wow, very disappointing to hear from you. How did he “serve time”? By laying low for 9 months? God forbid we hold powerful men accountable for the women they’ve abused and silenced. No, no, let this man get back on stage for 15 minutes to tell jokes!,” wrote Anna Akana @annaAkana

“That would only be true if he had apologised or shown any remorse for anyone other than himself for getting caught! All he did was disappear for a while – where’s the evidence that he actually listened? What has he done to redeem himself?,” wrote Ems @EmilyJDavis.

However, Michael has been listening to the Tweets he’s receiving and taking them to heart. The actor has walked back his stance and profusely apologized.

‘I expect a lot of this, so I will say only that I’m not going to defend what he did or what he lost or what his punishment “ought to be.” I’m only saying that we’re in uncharted waters and we need to figure out how to move forward,” he wrote.

“My empathy isn’t for Louis. It’s for the recognition that we’re in a cultural moment in which some men who do terrible things have no pathway for redemption. That lack of a pathway creates a situation in which we are casting people out but not giving them a way back in, He said in another Tweet.

“The movement is incredibly powerful and important and vital. One next step, among many steps, has to be figuring out a way for the men who are caught up in it to find redemption.

“I’ve spent the day unpacking my feelings on this and finally came to the conclusion that I was wrong and I apologize for being wrong. My heart intended something my head could not provide and I made a mess.”

“Not at all my intention to say that the abuser needs saving over the victims. If that’s how it came across, I sincerely apologize. I was trying to find a way to begin asking the question of “what is the correct penance”? I unintentionally offended a lot of people, and I’m sorry.”

Back in November 2017, Louis C.K. was accused by 5 women of sexual assault that was revealed by an article in “The New York Times.”

The comedian addressed the accusations in a statement released to the press, admitting the stories were true

“These stories are true” ,he wrote. “At the time, I said to myself that what I did was O.K. because I never showed a woman my d–k without asking first, which is also true. But what I learned later in life, too late, is that when you have power over another person, asking them to look at your d–k isn’t a question. It’s a predicament for them. The power I had over these women is that they admired me. And I wielded that power irresponsibly. I have been remorseful of my actions. And I’ve tried to learn from them. And run from them. Now I’m aware of the extent of the impact of my actions. I learned yesterday the extent to which I left these women who admired me feeling badly about themselves and cautious around other men who would never have put them in that position. I also took advantage of the fact that I was widely admired in my and their community, which disabled them from sharing their story and brought hardship to them when they tried because people who look up to me didn’t want to hear it. I didn’t think that I was doing any of that because my position allowed me not to think about it. There is nothing about this that I forgive myself for. And I have to reconcile it with who I am. Which is nothing compared to the task I left them with. I wish I had reacted to their admiration of me by being a good example to them as a man and given them some guidance as a comedian, including because I admired their work.”

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