Pete Davidson Apologizes to Lt. Com. Dan Crenshaw on SNL

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Saturday Night Live’s Pete Davidson is known for his abrasive and dry sense of humor— and sometimes, it gets him in trouble.

During the November 3 episode of SNL, Davidson made a controversial joke about former Navy SEAL and Representative-elect Dan Crenshaw, Republican of Texas, who lost an eye while serving in Afghanistan.

“You may be surprised to hear he’s a congressional candidate from Texas and not a hitman in a porno movie,” Davidson said during Weekend Update. “I’m sorry, I know he lost his eye in war or whatever.”

After receiving a lot of backlash for his comment, Davidson issued an apology a week later, during the November 10 episode. “In what I’m sure was a huge shock for people who know me, I made a poor choice last week,” he started.

“I mean this from the bottom of my heart. It was a poor choice of words. The man is a war hero, and he deserves all the respect in the world. And if any good came of this, maybe it was that for one day, the left and the right finally came together to agree on something. That I’m a [expletive].”

Dan Crenshaw then appeared next to Davidson. “Thanks for making a Republican look good,” Crenshaw said to Davidson.

Davidson issued his apology to Crenshaw— then, in a playful jab right back at Davidson, Crenshaw got a call on his cell phone and his ringtone was Pete Davidson’s ex, Ariana Grande’s song, “Breathin’.”

After a few more jokes, Crenshaw then issued a more serious statement to the American people:

“There’s a lot of lessons to learn here. Not just that the left and right can still agree on some things. But also this: Americans can forgive one another. We can remember what brings us together as a country and still see the good in each other. This is Veterans Day weekend. Which means that it’s a good time for every American to connect with a veteran. Maybe say, “Thanks for your service.” But I would actually encourage you to say something else. Tell a veteran, “Never forget.” When you say “never forget” to a veteran, you are implying that, as an American, you are in it with them — not separated by some imaginary barrier between civilians and veterans, but connected together as grateful fellow Americans who will never forget the sacrifices made by veterans past and present. And never forget those we lost on 9/11, heroes like Pete’s father. So I’ll just say, Pete, never forget.”

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